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Soybean (Glycine max)

The soybean (Glycine max), or soya bean, is a species of legume native to East Asia, widely grown for its edible bean, which has numerous uses. Fat-free (defatted) soybean meal is a significant and cheap source of protein for animal feeds and many packaged meals.

The beans contain significant amounts of phytic acid, dietary minerals and B vitamins. Soy vegetable oil, used in food and industrial applications, is another product of processing the soybean crop. Traditional unfermented food uses of soybeans include soy milk, from which tofu and tofu skin are made. Fermented soy foods include soy sauce, fermented bean paste, natto, and tempeh.

Chinese records dating prior to 2000 B.C. mention use of cultivated soybeans to produce edible soy oil. Ancient Chinese literature reveals that soybeans were extensively cultivated and highly valued as a use for the soybean oil production process before written records were kept.

Per 100 g, soybean oil has 16 g of saturated fat, 23 g of monounsaturated fat, and 58 g of polyunsaturated fat. The major unsaturated fatty acids in soybean oil triglycerides are the polyunsaturates alpha-linolenic acid, 7-10%, and linoleic acid, 51%; and the monounsaturate oleic acid, 23%. It also contains the saturated fatty acids stearic acid, 4%, and palmitic acid, 10%.

100 grams of raw soybeans supply 446 calories and are 9% water, 30% carbohydrates, 20% total fat, and 36% protein. Soybeans are an exceptional source of essential nutrients, providing in a 100 gram serving (raw, for reference) high contents of the Daily Value (DV) especially for protein (36% DV), dietary fiber (37%), iron (121%), manganese (120%), phosphorus (101%) and several B vitamins, including folate (94%). High contents also exist for vitamin K, magnesium, zinc and potassium.

Raw soybeans' 20% fat includes 3% saturated fat, 4% monounsaturated fat and polyunsaturated fat, mainly as linoleic acid. Within soybean oil or the lipid portion of the seed is contained four phytosterols: stigmasterol, sitosterol, campesterol, and brassicasterol accounting for about 2.5% of the lipid fraction; and which can be converted into steroid hormones. Additionally soybeans are a rich source of sphingolipids.

Find Organic Soybean Oil in the following BVO products.


For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.